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Bentley and Ducati co-create Diavel motorcycle

WORDS: SIMON DE BURTON | PHOTOS: DUCATI

Luxury car brands are well known for tempting owners with expensive trinkets branded with the name of their chosen marque, which is why there are Rolls-Royce Champagne chests, Maserati sneakers and a £9100 Porsche Design sound system made from a GT3 exhaust pipe.

Such items probably seem like bargains when you’ve paid a good six-figures for the motor, even if you’re not going to use them much – which is probably the thinking behind the growing trend for car makers and motorcycle manufacturers to collaborate on ‘high-end’ two-wheelers that, in most instances, will probably spend most of their lives as garage ornaments.

Aston Martin set the ball rolling with the launch of its Brough-Superior-based AMB 001 in 2019, following up last year with a more powerful and expensive Pro version.

The bike combines the frame and drivetrain of a standard Diavel V4 with handcrafted Bentley touches

The bike combines the frame and drivetrain of a standard Diavel V4 with handcrafted Bentley touches

In 2021, meanwhile, Ducati launched the Diavel 1260 Lamborghini, with the wraps coming off the Streetfighter V4 Lamborghini back in September of this year. And now the Bologna-based marque has set to work with Bentley (another name, as with Lamborghini and Ducati, that shelters beneath the Volkswagen Group umbrella) to create the Diavel for Bentley limited edition that will be available in 500 examples costing £58,000 apiece.

Unveiled on December 8, 2023 to an audience of high rollers at Art Basel Miami, the bike combines the frame and drivetrain of a standard Diavel V4 with handcrafted Bentley touches inspired by elements of the 18-unit, 740bhp Batur coupé.

Among these are bespoke forged wheel rims based on those of the car, side air intakes inspired by the Batur’s imposing radiator grille and a front mudguard, fairing and fuel-tank surface that are similar to the Bentley’s bonnet ribs. Many of the special parts are made from carbon fibre, while the seat of the bike is upholstered in the Alcantara favoured for competition cars and decorated with the same quilted pattern and Bentley logos as are found on the Batur’s seats. Elsewhere, the Diavel for Bentley gets a redesigned exhaust system, special dashboard and rear-light animations and a rich coat of Scarab Green metallic paint – a colour synonymous with the Flying B.

But for those who find the regular Diavel for Bentley a bit too pedestrian, there are a further 50 machines called Diavel for Bentley Mulliner, which will be available only to Bentley customers along with the offer of a personal consultation with Ducati’s design studio to help them configure the bike with bespoke colours for the seat, brake calipers, rims and bodywork.

The Mulliner option costs £71,000, and both it and the standard version are delivered in a personalised wooden case (yes, really) with an edition plate set into the carbon cover of the rear engine cylinder, an authenticity certificate, a pillion seat and a tailored cover.

And to top off the ‘look’, there is (of course) a ‘capsule’ clothing collection comprising a jet helmet and technical jacket in matching Scarab Green – but we doubt many buyers will be needing those…